A LOOK INTO AN ARBITRATOR’S CAREER PATH FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS STUDYING LAW IN THE US

Law is another one of the most popular and sought-after career pathways for graduates to take after finishing university. Although it is a career that is very rewarding and gives you the opportunity to earn a high salary, it does also require a specific skill set and commitment to be successful. It is also a job that you will need to train and work towards for several years, which may sound discouraging but will be worth it in the end!

A career in law has many benefits that other jobs may not have. It is a career path that leaves a lot of options and is broad in the various roles available in it. But apart from the career benefits, there are so many great things about doing law! For example, you can make a real difference in other people’s lives, and directly make an impact on issues in society like discrimination and human rights. You’ll be helping other people too, and have your work help those who don’t have your skills.

Not to mention, with a law degree, international students will gain the experience and qualifications that enable them to boost their employability when looking for jobs in the US. The skills you develop mean that you can interpret and analyse information, and develop logical thinking and communication competently and with self-assurance.  This article will be focused on the role of an arbitrator, their earning potential, and the recommended employers to help you get there after your degree.

ARBITRATOR – IS IT FOR ME?

An arbitrator is someone who helps settle legal disputes between two parties. They are essentially a neutral person that looks over the evidence from two parties and makes a final decision. There are different types of arbitration, as many legal matters require someone to assist in resolving them. For example, family issues, sports disputes, international disputes, employment and an assortment of financial disputes.  

Arbitrators will have responsibilities that will be specific on what kind of dispute they’re working on, but usually, you’ll always be expected to organise and carry out meetings with both parties, refer to the appropriate laws, collect evidence, clarify notices and make an informed decision to ultimately resolve the dispute.  

If you are an independent person with good attention to detail and organisation skills, this may be a great career path to consider, because arbitrators can also be self-employed. To do this successfully, however, you’ll need to network and build your professional reputation to attract clients.  

ULTIMATE EARNING POTENTIAL FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN THE US

Position in Career  Associated Salary (US)  
Entry Level  
Arbitrators who are starting out their career with not much experience will be starting on low salaries but can quickly rise up. There are no formal routes to take to be an arbitrator, but since your role will be related to the law, it would be strongly recommended to have a law degree. You would also be expected to have extensive training and membership in a professional association in order to be fully qualified.  
$44,000 
Experienced  
An experienced arbitrator would have an established reputation and work in the sector for a significant period of time. If they don’t have a degree, they might instead have substantial experience in law and legal practice.  
$63,000 
Senior  
Arbitrators in senior positions have more significant amounts of responsibility and even have postgraduate degrees too. Having a master’s can really boost your credibility and help you on your way to becoming a successful arbitrator.  
$103,000 

TOP 10 EMPLOYERS

  1. Maryland Courts 
  2. SubroClaims 
  3. Norfolk Southern Corp 
  4. Administrative Office of PA Courts 
  5. American Arbitration Association 
  6. Atrium Health 
  7. US Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service 
  8. NYC Careers 
  9. AmeriCares 
  10. AmeriCorps 

If you are considering studying abroad why don’t you discuss your prospects and opportunities with experts at Lurnable’s dedicated study abroad counselling division LurnPathways?


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